Saturday, March 14, 2020

Process Essay Essays

Process Essay Essays Process Essay Essay Process Essay Essay Process Essay Name: Institution: Process Essay Many people like going enjoy the outdoors, especially going for camps with their friends and families. While some have gained much experience from the camping trips they went to when they were younger, others have a bad experience because they are at a loss of what to do to take care of themselves. One of the most important activities that a person does when camping is making a fire. Some people have a difficult time trying to build a fire. They spend a long time trying to make the wood burn, and the whole area ends up filled with smoke. This negative experience can make some people hate camping. When making a campfire, a person should maintain high safety standards by controlling the fire and ensuring that he extinguishes it before leaving the area. Campfire is necessary for different purposes. Other than making food, it also helps people to keep warm. People tell stories around the campfire, and it helps to deter some unwanted visitors such as some animals away from the camp. There fore, it is essential to learn how to make a good campfire. Materials: Dry wood Kindling, this can include small twigs and branches Lighter/matches Tinder, which can include dry grass, paper, parts of plants such as tree barks and leaves Rocks Water Process: A person should ensure first that he or she makes the fire in an area where the earth is bare. The area should not have any dry grass or plants on it, and it should be far from any other vegetation such as trees A person begins by making a fire ring, which involves surrounding the area where he or she intends to build the fire with rocks Place the tinder at the center of the fire ring Use the lighter or match to ignite the tinder Add more tinder in the process, as it burns fast Add small pieces of the kindling to the tinder gradually, ensuring that it burns A person should continue increasing the kindling in the fire while ensuring that there is enough space for air Once the kindling has lighted nicely, add the dry wood fuel, one piece at a time, while ensuring that there is enough space between the pieces of woods to enable the passage of air Lay the pieces of wood in the fire in a way that they crisscross Points to Note: A person may need to blow at the base of the fire in case the fire goes out One should add the wood fuel only according to the size of the fire needed. Few pieces of wood will do if the person needs the fire for a short period Making the fire ring is essential because it helps to keep the fire under control Wet wood, kindling, and tinder will not light well A person should ensure that he does not build the fire near the tents A person should arrange the kindling and wood in such a way that there is enough space for air passage. This ensures that there is enough oxygen to keep the fire going A person should put out the fire once he is done with it by sprinkling water on the coals

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

AMPACK Computer Company Computer Platform Upgrade Essay

AMPACK Computer Company Computer Platform Upgrade - Essay Example This will help in the transmission and processing of different computerized jobs at hand. To accomplish this, a server that will serve for internet connection provider and a file server need allocation in the office setup. All computer units must have LAN cards installed and a server router or network switch provided to mediate the connection. Once you know what type of computer hardware and software you will need, it is time for you to decide whether you want to purchase for a desktop or laptop computer. To help you decide, we will list the major advantages and disadvantages of both types of computers. The type of computer you choose will depend on how you intend to use it. A portable desktop computer platform is used on a typical office setup, which can be adopted in the company's system. However, laptops are also applicable in some departments preferably the managerial branch to have it transferable if corporate meeting presentation is needed or other similar cases. Portability is more important than performance, because you need to move the computer routinely, choose a laptop. If you will be moving the system very frequently, consider a smaller-sized laptop. Choosing the right Operating System for AMPACK office infrastructure is easily managed since there are current systems involved. Installing Windows XP for the workstation platform and windows 2003 for the server could minimize the current software needs of employees for production jobs. Most computer software needed to do the task involved in production, accounting, and managerial are mostly based on windows environment. Preferring to use this operating system would minimize cost for an over-all adjustment if a new operating system will be used. Not only minimizing the cost for software adjustment but also minimizes the cost for future technical training to staffs who physically involves with the workstations on their daily task. In relation to that, our server will be under the Windows 2003 Server system. The concern for this is the reliability, security and robustness compared to other operating system. Windows 2003 Server edition offers a complete solution for a typical server. T his comprises the file server, internet, printer, email, DNS and database server. If we will consider using Linux and other operating system, the employees will have to adjust to the environment, which they currently are familiar. Software adjustment will be costly if we will use other operating system. Some may say that other software is free or is cheaper than windows but the software and hardware compatibility is limited. The software needed in the company's daily task may not be compatible to other operating system. Thus, windows based systems are encouraged to install because of its wide-range of compatibility that meets the company's requirements. Other than windows and Linux, Macintosh would be an expensive option. Many people are unaware of how easy and inexpensive it is to interconnect existing computers to form a small Local Area Network (LAN). If you are using Windows 2000/XP, no additional software is required to benefit from basic network functions such as shared use of directories, drives, or printers and the hardware costs are minimal. A network can substantially simplify internet access for two or more people. Of course, another reason for setting

Monday, February 10, 2020

The United States (Foreign) policy towards Haiti Essay

The United States (Foreign) policy towards Haiti - Essay Example The richest 10% receive 48% of the national income while the poorest 10% receives less than 1%. More than 70% of these immigrants live in Florida and New York states. Haiti has been ranked as the most politically corrupt state in the world.3 The tax structure majorly targets the basic commodities produced by peasants while ignoring the capitalist class. This work will address the US foreign policy towards Haiti as we try to establish the relations that have been there between the two countries. The essay will revolve around the interactions between the two countries to cover the question in an amicable manner. Haiti gained independence from their French colonizers under the leadership of Napoleon Bonaparte in January 1804. However France did not recognize their sovereign state until 1825 when Haiti paid 150 million gold francs to compensate for lost property, slaves, land and equipment France had used during the colonial era.4 Haiti had to shoulder an economic burden in the form of high interest loans which was fully paid in 1947. Arguably the U.S migration policy on Haiti is hurting. In 1957 Duvalier established a dictatorship government which combined violence against political opponents and instilling fear among citizens through the use of coercive power and threats. U.S.A government suspended aid program towards Haiti in 1961 after allegations surfaced that he had misappropriated aid money. Duvalier’s son Jean Claude inherited his father’s presidency after his death in 1971. His regime dropped some of the coercive elements that characterized his father’s presidency. The United States thus restored its aid program to Haiti in 1971. Duvalier was forced into exile after months of disorder in the country after Pope John Paul II condemned the regime.5 A provisional military government took control from 1986 to 1988 and a new constitution enacted. This provided for an elected parliament, an

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Justifying The State Essay Example for Free

Justifying The State Essay Q1 If the state is not a voluntary organisation, how can one be under any obligation to obey its commands? This is a question about justifying the state. What D. D. Raphael calls the grounds of political obligation.1 If the state can be justified somehow then so can the commands it makes, whether it is voluntary or not. This would be a state built on individual consent; obligation to the commands of the state would flow from that consent. This essay will discuss the possibility of justifying of the state through the idea of a social contract. The state when it creates a law draws a line one cannot cross without consequences. For clarity I am talking about a serious law, specifically one that obviously has a moral base, the law against murder for example. An individualist might say I have no intention of crossing that line anyway because I believe it would be morally wrong to do so. The law in his case may as well not exist. Just by not breaking a law it can appear as though he supports it. When what he might agree with is what the law defends/upholds /represents, and that is the moral principle behind it. This is one reason why some people appear to uphold the law when in fact all they may be doing is following a personal moral code. or simply agreeing with the basic rational belief shared by most people that murder is wrong or (maybe) tax for the NHS is good for example. I suggest this analogy can be applied when questioning many commands of the state. When I obey the state by paying taxes, I may not be doing so because I am obligated too by law but for other reasons including moral ones. Socialists (as do many others) might argue that they are happy to pay more tax in return for a wider societal benefit that includes all, i.e. as in the National Health Service. Therefore a socialist might argue that she paid her National Insurance not because the law obligates her too, but because it fits her moral attitudes and outlook anyway. The fact that she has no legal right to refuse to pay becomes relevant in this case only if she actually doesnt. The above argument is Lockean to the extent that it appeal[s] to the idea of individual consent.2 It is also in part my own view, which is (I think) essentially individualist in nature, though not libertarian. The relevance of my own view to this essay is that when thinking about this question, I realised that I had no idea what my own moral position was regarding some of the most crucial problems and contradictions of political philosophy. Many of these questions require (I think) a moral stance in order to be able to make sense of them. This may seem like a non-academic approach as if I am personalising or reducing this essay to subjective notions, however the questions and issues of political philosophy are in large part moral questions and issues that therefore have as a basis, personal moral opinions. Lockes view according to Wolff is that obligations to the institutions of the state must be justified in terms of the will, choices or decisions of those over whom they have authority.3 Justification of the institutions of the state that enforce obligation then is reliant on the idea that personal autonomy is of premier value. Will Kymlicka defines this as the belief that the individual is morally prior to the community. One objection to this is the communitarian argument that the individual is not morally prior to the community instead individuals are a product of the community.4 There are other objectors to Lockes idea that autonomy is the primary value. Wolff writes that Bentham considered the primary value is not autonomy but happiness whether we consent to the state is irrelevant. 5 This utilitarian argument is that the happiness of society, as a whole is of more value than personal autonomy or the happiness of the few or one. And that therefore one has a duty to obey the commands of the state as it pursues this goal. So if the state decides that having nuclear weapons is for the greater good (happiness) then I would be obligated to pay my share of tax for them whatever I thought. I may be against nuclear weapons or the military in general for moral reasons (pacifism for example) but my moral objection is sacrificed for the greater happiness. The problem political philosophers face is finding ways to solve issues like the one above. Just how does one justify the state? One theory is the idea of the social contract. Wolff here defines the project of the social contract theory. The project of showing that individuals consent to the state lies behind the idea of social contract theory. If, somehow or other, it can be shown that every individual has consented to the state, or formed a contract with the state, or made a contract with each other to create a state, then the problem appears to be solved.6 It is difficult to support the idea that the state, and thereby its commands and responding obligations, can be justified by the theory of a social contract. The theory of a social contract tries to justify political obligation as being based on an implicit promise, like the obligation to obey the rules of a voluntary association.7 If there were such a contract (based on the idea that the state is a voluntary organisation) the problem of individual obligation to the state would be solved. One could join (or leave) institutions of the state at will, and not be subject to state penalties. This is clearly not so. To clarify this further I can ask a different question: how much like a voluntary association is the state? The consensus among political philosophers is I think that the state is not a voluntary organisation. To be born is to be joined to it. As Raphael says the universality of the states jurisdiction makes its compulsory character more pervasive and more evident. 8 Individuals are inextricably linked to it in many ways, for example through the financial/legal institutions. Neither of these institutions are voluntary, they both carry obligations that are enforceable by law. For a comparison I will examine what I think a voluntary organisation is. The obligations I have to the UEA regarding my degree, I agreed to honour. They were stated, I accepted. This does not mean I think the UEA is perfect. Just because I am obligated, (I agreed to the UEA rules) does not mean I cannot criticise the parking problem. What is important is that I chose to join. My obligations to the UEA are voluntary, and I can withdraw from them voluntarily and leave the university should I choose. This is not possible in the case of the state. [I] am subject to the rules whether I like it or not.9 As a general philosophical attitude I am nervous or sceptical of organisations people are forced to join or have to remain joined to, this includes the idea of a state. This could be framed as, (if this sentence makes sense) I do not like the idea that there is a group I am unable not to join. These reasons might help to explain why I am generally sceptical of some of the motives of our own state. So where does this leave us? The above contentions highlight some of the problems of the social contract theory. The central objection to it is that the state is not voluntary therefore there can be no mutually agreed contract. Nor has there historically ever been one. As Wolff observes, if there ever was a social contract What is the evidence? Which museum is it in?10 The idea of a hypothetical contract is an attempt to solve this problem. It does not rely on any formal notion of actual consent, be it historical, express, or tacit.11 The hypothetical contract relies on hypothetical consent. If hypothetical consent were possible it would provide a moral reason for political obligation. That is the ingredient the question this essay is discussing implicitly implies is missing. The idea asks us to imagine a position from where we could successfully negotiate a social contract. Rawls idea is a very complex one that effects many issues. In his Theory of Justice, Rawls sets out primarily to establish what moral principles should govern the basic structure of a just society.12 Rawls Theory of Justice suggests a set of specific moral principles that he hopes will achieve this consensus view. It is these principles that critics of the theory in the main object to. What they are concerned with is the kind of society that would emerge from behind any veil of ignorance whatever its character. For the purpose of this essay the idea of a veil of ignorance which is subject to many conditions, is the device Rawls uses to argue for consent. If people can agree on what would be just, (which he argues is possible using the principles he suggests) from behind a veil of ignorance the consent reached would be a voluntary contract. Again the problem remains, what principles really constitute a just society are not clear. Objections to Rawls ideas include the libertarian critique. Kukathas and Pettit13 argue that for principled libertarians like Nozick the state that would emerge from Rawlss theory is bound to seem inherently evil.14 Nozicks objections are based on his libertarian view that Individuals have rights, and there are things no person or group may do to them (without violating their rights)15 To conclude is this essay is very difficult; the argument I have tried to demonstrate is that one cannot be under any obligation to obey the commands of the state using the social contract model. I have argued that the social contract fails because it is not consensual. I have also tried to show that the idea of hypothetical contract cannot work because the veil of ignorance still does not produce consent because people cannot agree on what the principles of a just state are. One can only be obligated to obey the commands of the state (I think) when its principles are consensual. Bibliography Chandran Kukathas and Philip Pettit, Rawls, A Theory of Justice and its Critics, (Polity Press 1990) Kymlicka, Will, Contemporary Political philosophy. Raphael, D D, Problems of Political Philosophy, (Macmillan press 1990) Wolff, Jonathan, An Introduction to Political Philosophy, (oxford University Press 1996) Colin Dunlop His II Political Philosophy Dr Kathleen Stock 04-04-03 Q1 If the state is not a voluntary organisation, how can one be under any obligation to obey its commands? 1 Raphael, D D, Problems of Political Philosophy, p175 2 Wolff, Jonathan, An Introduction to Political Philosophy, p38 3 Ibid.p38 4 See Kymlicka, Will, Contemporary Political philosophy, Ch5 (I think) his discussion multiculturalism and communitarianism. 5 Ibid.p38 6 Ibid.p43 7 Raphael, D D, Problems of Political Philosophy, p182 8 Ibid.p181 9 Ibid.p181 10 Wolff, Jonathan, An Introduction to Political Philosophy, p44 11 Ibid.p44 12 Chandran Kukathas and Philip Pettit, Rawls, A Theory of Justice and its Critics, p36 13 Ibid. See chapter 5 The Libertarian Critique 14 Ibid.p74 15 Robert Nozick quoted by Chandran Kukathas and Philip Pettit in, Rawls, A Theory of Justice and its Critics, p76

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

America Needs to Use Less Chemicals :: Farming Agriculture Environmental Essays

America Needs to Use Less Chemicals How would you like going to the grocery store and finding out that prices on your regular food items have increased sharply? How would society react to a giant inflation on goods that are needed most? Would poverty and starvation increase with such inflation? These are all questions that would have to be answered if farm chemicals were to be banned throughout the world. Banning farm chemicals, such as herbicides and pesticides, would in turn lower the yields farmers would receive from their crops. It would also increase the demand for food, along with the price the consumer would have to pay. But, are there alternative ways of controlling weeds and insects, using a more natural way society will find more acceptable? This debate has been growing more and more each year, but no answer has availed itself. When farmers and society cooperate, education and limits can help slow down pollution and still keep yields to a maximum. Under the current circumstances, farm chemicals are needed for both the farmer and society. With education, chemicals can be used efficiently by everyone. In the debate over chemicals, many people in society believe that more organic fertilizers and weed killers should be used to eliminate pollution due to chemicals. This is a great hypothesis, but when you examine the problem this is nearly impossible. Manure is just one of the examples on how the pollution of fertilizers and weed killers could be reduced. Manure is an organic substance that can substitute many other forms of fertilizers. In reality, it would be impossible to cover every acre of farm ground with manure. Society today is led to believe that manure is safe for water and is free of pollution when actually it is not. Manure potentially carries many funguses and bacteria that can pollute our water supply. Recently it was discovered that a natural fertilizer has the potential of killing many types of noxious weeds. Nick Christians, an Iowa State University researcher, has discovered corn gluten to be the first "natural" weed killer and fertilizer. Corn gluten is a protein s ubstance extracted from corn during processing. Researchers have found that the corn gluten extract has the potential to interfere with germination in crabgrass and other noxious weeds. On the other hand, "the natural corn byproduct is less effective and more expensive than synthetic weed killers," noted Christians (28). America Needs to Use Less Chemicals :: Farming Agriculture Environmental Essays America Needs to Use Less Chemicals How would you like going to the grocery store and finding out that prices on your regular food items have increased sharply? How would society react to a giant inflation on goods that are needed most? Would poverty and starvation increase with such inflation? These are all questions that would have to be answered if farm chemicals were to be banned throughout the world. Banning farm chemicals, such as herbicides and pesticides, would in turn lower the yields farmers would receive from their crops. It would also increase the demand for food, along with the price the consumer would have to pay. But, are there alternative ways of controlling weeds and insects, using a more natural way society will find more acceptable? This debate has been growing more and more each year, but no answer has availed itself. When farmers and society cooperate, education and limits can help slow down pollution and still keep yields to a maximum. Under the current circumstances, farm chemicals are needed for both the farmer and society. With education, chemicals can be used efficiently by everyone. In the debate over chemicals, many people in society believe that more organic fertilizers and weed killers should be used to eliminate pollution due to chemicals. This is a great hypothesis, but when you examine the problem this is nearly impossible. Manure is just one of the examples on how the pollution of fertilizers and weed killers could be reduced. Manure is an organic substance that can substitute many other forms of fertilizers. In reality, it would be impossible to cover every acre of farm ground with manure. Society today is led to believe that manure is safe for water and is free of pollution when actually it is not. Manure potentially carries many funguses and bacteria that can pollute our water supply. Recently it was discovered that a natural fertilizer has the potential of killing many types of noxious weeds. Nick Christians, an Iowa State University researcher, has discovered corn gluten to be the first "natural" weed killer and fertilizer. Corn gluten is a protein s ubstance extracted from corn during processing. Researchers have found that the corn gluten extract has the potential to interfere with germination in crabgrass and other noxious weeds. On the other hand, "the natural corn byproduct is less effective and more expensive than synthetic weed killers," noted Christians (28).

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Not for the Adolescent

Mr. Jordan AP English III 13 January 2013 Huckleberry Finn For decades, Mark Twain’s â€Å"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn† has spurred many controversies because of its offensive language, bad grammar, and racial bias. Some schools have even banned it from being taught; despite the benefits that one receives from it. When read to the right audience, one could learn from the harsh dialect, the use of satire, and the historical setting.However, because of the more advanced components of this book, â€Å"The Adventures of Huck Finn† should only be taught to high-school seniors in advanced English classes. One of the most popular reasons as to why â€Å"The Adventures of Huck Finn† is banned in some schools is because of the use of offensive language such as the â€Å"n† word and other racist comments and actions, mostly when referring to Jim, the runaway slave. In an article written by Allen Webb, he states, â€Å"†¦it was clear that hearing the word come out of my mouth made my African American†¦students bristle. Because of the book’s constant use of the term and other instances of racism such as when Huck takes advantage of Jim’s gullibility and lack of education, tricking him with a snake skin, and later tries to convince him that a series of dramatic events were a dream, which both confuses and upsets Jim, makes teaching the book very difficult, no matter how sensitive one will attempt to be. For this reason, â€Å"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn† should not be taught anywhere except in advanced senior English classes.As an advanced student, the level of maturity tends to be higher and the curriculum consists of a more broad and difficult selection, preparing the students for any style or type of writing. When hearing the use of a term such as the â€Å"n† word, most of these students will see it as a term to portray the time period and evoke strong emotions from the audience inst ead of taking it to offense. While the controversies that the offensive language stirs up are understandable, â€Å"The Adventures of Huck Finn† should be taught for the opportunity to discuss topics such as racism and to learn from Twain’s unique writing style.Without the opportunity to read â€Å"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,† students would lose the chance to experience Twain’s use of satirical humor and a historical setting and dialect. In an interview with Nancy Methelis, she says that â€Å"The Adventures of Huck Finn† â€Å"†¦is a part of American history as American literature, so they can see it its place within the spectrum of literature and history. † The book lends a realistic depiction of life during the times of slavery and helps to more understand the feelings and struggles of African Americans. Also throughout the book is a heavy use of satire.For example, Miss Watson attempts to become and better Christian, yet sh e owns slaves and considers them her property. Another instance is when Pap becomes outraged at the thought of a black man being able to vote even though the black man is more educated that him. Twain uses the tool of irony and satire to poke fun at the idea of white supremacy and uses his writing style to portray the flaws in society. By reading â€Å"The Adventures of Huck Finn,† one can build their reading skill by deciphering Twain’s style and can also experience an accurate description of pre-Civil War life.In conclusion, â€Å"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn† should be taught in advanced senior classes only to ensure the students are mature enough to handle the complex aspects of the book such as the harsh language and literary tools. Although some might believe that the book is offensive and better off banned, I believe that the benefits one will receive from reading â€Å"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,† such as realistic depictions of hist ory and fine examples of American literature, are much too valuable.

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Chrysanthemums Essay - 1649 Words

John Steinbeck’s, The Chrysanthemums, was published in 1938 in a book of short stories, entitled The Long Valley. The Chrysanthemums has been a rather powerful draw for scholars because of its wide gap for interpretations and analysis of its main protagonist character, Elisa Allen and also the unique descriptions used to portray the deeper meaning behind the setting of the story. Themes of sexuality, oppression of women, as well as other numerous types of conflict portrayed in this rather somber short story have made it a popular study among scholars and students alike. Steinbeck also uses literary elements including a dramatic tone, rich symbolism, and personification which increase the stories feeling and value exponentially. Steinbeck†¦show more content†¦In conjunction with the symbolic representation of Elisa’s life, the dramatic description of the environment can also be seen as a unique representation of the relationship conflict between husband and wife . Steinbeck’s foggy description demonstrates conflict through the following statement, a time of quiet and waiting. This description is interesting because the fields are personified as waiting for rain, however, â€Å"rain and fog do not go together† therein lies the conflict just as Elisa waits for a positive change in how her husband treats her (Palmerino, Gregory J). Gregory P. further points out that, â€Å"The natural elements of the foothills ranch seem as unwilling to confront each other as the characters that inhabit its environs. Hence, fog and rain can be seen as the female and male equivalents to Elisa and Henry.† This only further solidifies the deep rooted troubles within Elisa and her relationship with her husband. The setting of the story is personified to act as a symbolic representation of the couple’s relationship (Steinbeck, John 337-338). The story concerns the unhappy marriage, which appears to be a theme in many of Steinbeck’s short stories, and the psychological effects this has primarily on the wife, Elisa Allen. The central character, Elisa, is appealing to many readers and scholars alike, because of the depth of her persona. Elisa is introduced to us in a less than feminine fashion which can be seen as a hint at oppression of women inShow MoreRelatedThe Chrysanthemums973 Words   |  4 Pages Prompt: How do the chrysanthemums as well as other symbols throughout the short story show women’s role in society? A Potential for Equality   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Humans, just as flowers, cannot fully live without sunlight. They cannot develop without nourishment, and most of all they cannot flourish if not carefully tended to. Just as the Chrysanthemums fight to stay strong and meaningful in the short story, â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† by John Steinbeck, the main character, Emily, tries to do the same. BothRead MoreEssay on The Chrysanthemums1123 Words   |  5 Pages Everything is everything in the world of short stories. Steinbecks The Chrysanthemums is full of thick rhetoric that raises questions and stirs the mind and imagination. Everything from the title, to the last line needs to be thought about more than once. The story isnt just about a farmers wife who likes pretty flowers. Not in the least! The Chrysanthemums is a story about how Elisa Allen is forced to a life that she feels is trapping her. The story is set in the early twentieth centuryRead MoreThe Chrysanthemums By John Steinbeck Essay1694 Words   |  7 Pages The story â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† by John Steinbeck, like many stories by this author, is loaded with symbolism and concepts about human nature. Each description of characters, places, and physical aspects is written in a way that is simple to understand, but one should not be tricked by his ordinary words since there is always a greater meaning behind them. In this particular story, if one considers the period of time when the story was written, which was the nineteen thirties, is perceived how SteinbeckRead MoreThe Use of Symbols in John Steinbecks The Chrysanthemums720 Words   |  3 PagesIn John Steinbecks short story, The Chrysanthemums, he uses the flower to symbolize his main characters thoughts and ideas. There are many examples of such symbolism in this work. Elisa Allen is a lonely woman who enjoys growing and nourishing her chrysanthemums. Since her husband is always working the cattle in their farm, she never has enough attention or any kind of affection. The result of this dispassionate marriage leads Steinbeck to describe his main character as follows, Her faceRead MoreSymbolism in the Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck1758 Words   |  8 PagesJohn Steinbecks The Chrysanthemums is a story that is full of symbolism. After the first read, it might seem like an innocent tale about a woman and her garden. However, upon further examination, the reader learns it is actually a story about a womans desires and frustrations in her life. Steinbeck uses many examples, such as the flowers to symbolize the thoughts and ideas of the main character, Elisa, in this story. Elisa Allen is a lonesome woman who gets pleasure from growingRead More John Steinbeck’s The Chrysanthemums Essay572 Words   |  3 Pages In John Steinbeck’s The Chrysanthemums, the reader is introduced to the seemingly timid and shy Elisa Allen. Elisa is routinely planting her yearly sets of Chrysanthemums, which appear to be the sole receptor of her caring and gentle touch, but all the while it is evident that â€Å"the chrysanthemum stems seemed too small and easy for her energy.† Her hidden eagerness seems not only out of place, but out of touch with her dry and wilted surroundings, of which her husband, Henry, abruptly interruptsRead MorePrincess Masako Analysis991 Words   |  4 Pagescommoner that was very studious, outspoken, and she enjoyed playing softball as well as tennis; she experiences the feeling of having no freedom. This story uncovers the harsh reality of Masako’s journey before and after marrying the prince of the Chry santhemum throne, Naruhito Hironomiya, which includes her moving to many places with her family, her efforts in getting a job, and her life as a princess. After Masako and Naruhito got married, the new princess became a puppet controlled by the KunaichoRead MoreOdour of Chrysanthemums964 Words   |  4 PagesA Hint of Death In literature, foreshadowing is a warning or indication of a future event. Foreshadowing can tell you the possible outcome of a work of literature. In D. H. Lawrence’s â€Å"Odour of Chrysanthemums,† he uses the literary technique of foreshadowing to hint to the reader of the tragedy that Elizabeth Bates will soon learn happened to her husband Walter Bates. Throughout the story we follow Mrs. Bates at home with the children and gain knowledge of statements, descriptions, and objectsRead MoreThe Chrysanthemums And The Storm929 Words   |  4 Pagesâ€Å"The Chrysanthemums† vs. â€Å"The Storm† â€Å"The Storm†, was written by Kate Chopin, who was a feminist writer who insinuated that women had an unspoken sexual appetite and longed for independence. She wrote stories that were considerably taboo of her time, including â€Å"The Storm†, which was about a woman in a content marriage, longing for attention and excitement who leans on another man for it. On the other end of the American literature spectrum, there is John Steinbeck, who was also a feminist writerRead MoreThe Chrysanthemums Essay962 Words   |  4 PagesJohn Steinbeck’s â€Å"The Chrysanthemums†, is a story about a woman struggling with strong inner feelings of loneliness and isolation. Elisa Allen is initially portrayed as a woman who overcompensates and whose tasks are far exceeded by her abilities. She appears content with her life and adores tending to her garden. However, a tinker briefly enters her life and through his power of persuasion and manipulation provides Elisa with ho pes of change and excitement. He gives her the much needed attention